Why are perlick faucets better? (Explained)

Perlick faucets are better because they feature a revolutionary ball and floating O-ring design that eliminates the need for a valve shaft.  Because of the forward sealing design the faucet never sticks and mold and bacteria are less likely to grow inside.

Have you ever gone to pour a beer after a week, and the faucet handle doesn’t move because it is stuck?

Or have you noticed that you can’t control your beer flow by pressure, the beer either pours too fast or too slow.  Too much head vs. not enough?

That’s what Perlick had in mind when then designed the ultimate faucet for pouring beers.

After investing a lot of money into building your kegerator or keezer, you see a beer faucet and think well I need 4 of these and it’s the difference between $25 or $75 dollars each, is there really a difference?

100%, skip the cheap stuff and go stainless forward sealing!  

What is a Perlick faucet?

The Perlick faucet is the Cadillac of beer faucets. 

Not only does it have a unique forward sealing internal function it also has its very own unique appearance.

The Perlick faucets are all forward sealing which gives the person pouring the beer control of the foam that comes out. Move the lever forward and get a normal pour and pull the lever back 3/4 of the way through the pour and finish it with a nice amount of head.  That is called the creamer piston on the 680SS and 690SS models.

Table of Contents

What is a forward sealing faucet?

On the outside, it looks like the normal faucet you see beer being poured from.  But it’s what you can’t see that sets this aside from the others.

Inside the forward sealing faucet:

  • Bearing Cup-Follower – Supports the o-ring to maintain a positive seal and provide smooth tracking of the handle.
  • Floating Front Seal –  Features a contoured profile to provide enhanced surface contact for positive seal.
  • Spout angle is verticle – Provides better pour and draining.  Drop off begins just beyond the O-ring, with no flat area for beer to collect.

Forward sealing faucets have a smooth beer flow and less agitation that leads to foamy beer.

What does a flow control faucet do?

The flow control works by using a separate lever on the side of the faucet. 

The lever can adjust the flow of the faucet by being wide-open to closed, which could help certain beers that may need more or less control being poured.  Foamy beer is usually the issue

There are a couple of factors that make some beers foamy or not at all.  The CO2 pressure, the length of the beer line, and the faucet.  To have a properly balanced keg system, having a flow control faucet does help.  

Are Perlick faucets worth it?

I totally understand why you would want to just buy the standard faucets when you are just beginning.  But if you want the best, the Perlick is a great upgrade for your tap system.

Perlick faucets are worth it, the faucets are designed for you to control the beer and to eliminate the drips, which over time will make the faucet stick and grow mold on them.  

If your standard faucet is giving you any reason to upgrade, a Perlick will not disappoint you!

Which Perlick faucet do I need?

Perlick has 4 revolutionary faucets all featuring the forward seal.  But some do a little more than the other, and maybe you need the basic Perlick or you need the flow control, forward seal, and creamer?

Let’s go over the 4 Perlick faucets that are available.

1.) 630SS

The 630SS has forward sealing, 304 stainless steel construction, brass body, and chrome plated. 

The angle of the spout is more verticle, which allows for a great pour and less drip.

The Perlick 630SS is the more affordable of them all, this is a straightforward faucet that has the benefits that all the Perlicks do like I mentioned above. 

2.) 650SS

This faucet has the great qualities of the 630SS, but what sets this apart is the flow control lever.

The flow lever lets you adjust the amount of beer to be passed through the faucet.  Why do you need it?  If you have a multi beer system running off one CO2 tank, this can help control the beer, especially if it seems like it is too pressured.  Being able to tweak the faucet per beer is a really nice option.

3.) 680SS

Ok, so this is like the 630SS except it doesn’t have flow control, but instead, it has a push back creamer handle.

What is that?  The handle works to create the perfect beer pour with head every time.  So it works like this, you pull the lever forward like normal, and towards the end of the beer is when the creamer piston goes to work.  You push the lever back and the turbulence created by the beer passing through the creamer holes makes it, well creamy!

Working in a bar, I’ve had issues with pouring beer after beer and the Co2 can’t catch up, so by the 3 or 4th beer the head is gone.  This lever works well, and ultimately maximizes your keg yield and improves your bottom end, in terms of dollars.

Do you need this for your keezer or kegerator?  In my opinion, no, but if you pour lots of beers, then you know what I mean that the CO2 can’t keep the keg charged fast enough, so this could improve your beer pour.

4.) 690SS

To sum up the Perlick 690SS, it’s probably the ultimate beer tap that combines all of Perlick’s finest qualities.  

It has the forward sealing technology, flow control, and the creamer lever on top of the solid steel build, brass body, chrome finish, and down angle spout.

What more can I say, this is not just a faucet, this is the faucet that gives you the most control when pouring your beer.

How do you clean Perlick faucets?

The good news is you really don’t need to take these apart, although you can its not necessary if you keep up on cleaning them.

Remove the faucet from the shank, open the faucet and soak them overnight in your preferred cleaner like oxy clean, or a beer line cleaner also works.

You can use a soft brush scrubber to clean the inside and outside.  Rinse a few times with clean water, opening and closing the tap while doing so.

How much does a Perlick faucet cost?

Prices pulled from the Amazon Product Advertising API on:

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